Company History

Founded in 1982 in California, we operated from 1983 to 1988 in Berkeley California under ARC Data Systems. In 1988 we relocated to Eugene, Oregon, and incorporated as Advanced Relay Corporation (ARC). ARC developed and marketed LayGO®, a multiprotocol toolkit targeted at integrators of PC-based WANs, such as X.25 packet routers, bridges, switches, gateways, Frame Relay access devices, packet assembler/disassemblers and packet multiplexers. In addition we combined the use of LayGO® protocols with Ethernet, TCP or UDP/IP and FTP. In 2004, we introduced the PXS (Protocol eXchange Server), a microprocessor based external communication server that combines LayGO®, TCP/IP with a powerful microprocessor.

The company's primary markets are companies who need to incorporate legacy equipment into their IP networks: telecom, aviation, transportation, banking and defense. In addition, Advanced Relay provides consulting services, such as software porting, customization and certification, to facilitate the integration of Advanced Relay's products into customers' systems.

Company Timeline

2010

  • ARC released the PXSu.

  • ARC released this new website.

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2009

  • ARC received the first PXSu prototypes.
  • NATO Belgium uses the PXSe as X.25 to TCP/IP Gateway.
  • MIT Lincoln Labs uses the PXSe synchronous to TCP/IP gateway.
  • ARC continued the development of the PXSu. The product was tested at 4 Mbps full duplex HDLC with V.35 and RS-422 differential interfaces.
  • ARC started developing a new website.

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2008

  • ARC started work on the PXSu (LayGO® USB to Synchronous) adapter.
  • For QinetiQ we implemented a special BERT (Bit Error Rate Test) to test satellite links.
  • We upgraded Guam Cell to include leased line V.35 DSU connections from Saipan to Guam.
  • After several months of pilot testing with increasing numbers of PXS gateways replacing the ISDN Terminal Adapters, Swisscom approved the use of the PXS FTAM/X.25-to-SFTP/TCP/IP gateway in their FixNet. All switches are now using the PXS.
  • With Swisscom's approval we released the new version of the PXS. It will replace the previous PXS.
  • Because of temporary delivery problems of the Digi Sync 570i PCI adapters used by several customers, we ported LayGO® to the MicroGate 2/4-line FPGA based PCI synchronous adapter.

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2007

  • For the Swisscom Fixnet project we added APIUS (Automatic PXS Installation and Update Services) Services and a Java interface to the PXS Remote Control Server.
  • In a joint operation with Innovative Systems we developed the BSC 3780/BSC interface for the Siemens Carlson/Stromberg. The PXS is used as BMC/3780-to-LFTP gateway. The system was successfully employed on multiple switches and works error-free.
  • In cooperation with EINSTEIN Technology Taiwan and China Telecom (CHTC) we successfully collected CDR files from a Siemens EWSD using our PXS FTAM/X.25-to-SFTP/TCP/IP gateway. All tests were done remotely from our office in Eugene using a secure connection. Due to CHTC reorganization the project is on hold and IBM Taiwan replaced Einstein Technology.
  • We tested successfully the first PXS2 prototypes. We applied for most relevant international acceptance tests and past them all. We also decided to build additional RoHS compliant units.
  • Guam Cell (now Docomo Pacific) used our PXS for CDR capture from Motorola EMX2500 switches both in Guam and Saipan (Mariana Islands).
  • Implemented Nortel XFER/X.25-to-LFTP/TCP/IP Gateway.
  • In cooperation with FinAvia Helsinki, we remotely tested several radar interfaces: RDIF, HDLC/LAPB. For the tests we used the PXS as HDLC-to-TCP/IP gateway. Due to ongoing reorganization, the project was put on hold.

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2006

  • Megasys Computer Technologies in Alberta, Canada uses the PXS to connect to Alcatel radios.
  • Because the lack of qualified manpower at Telekom Darmstadt, T-Systems Göppingen informed us that the FixNet Project was put on hold. No feasibility testing was planned.
  • Swisscom decided to approve feasibility testing of the PXS FTAM/X.25-to-SFTP/TCP/IP gateway for their FixNet, a mix of Siemens EWSD and Ericsson AXE switches. Swisscom's requirement was to use SFTP between the PXSs and the collector. We evaluated several SFTP solutions and selected Mocana's SFTP client. As SFTP server, we tested the Linux implementation, and both parts were working correctly. In cooperation with Aartesys and Swisscom, the tests were successfully completed by end of December, and Swisscom gave the green light for the project.
  • Remote System Integration uses the PXS as TCP/IP-to-X.25 gateway to remotely communicate to airports using a leased line V.35 connection.
  • For Elesia SpA, Italy, we ported our driver for the Sealevel ACB-MP.PCI card to Linux.
  • For Air Services Australia, Advanced Relay developed a X.25-to-UDP/IP gateway. The X.25 Broadcast Server, xcast, uses IP multicast to make data received from X.25 virtual circuits available to multiple remote stations.
  • In a joint operation with Innovative Systems, we developed the AMATPS/X.25-to-LFTP/TCP/IP Gateway for the Siemens EWSD. As the gateway interface, we used the PXS. The system was successfully deployed and worked error-free.

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2005

  • In a joint project with Aartesys Switzerland, Swisscom selected ARC's PXS X.Net gateway for their Payphone Project. Rather than using phone books, Swiss payphones use interactive terminals. Multiple terminals are connected to one terminal controller. About 60 terminal controllers are now connected via X.25 to the PXS X.Net and from there to a Swisscom intranet.
  • ARC in a joint project with Telesciences, we upgraded TDS Madison CDR collector and BMC HDLC/NRM (SDLC Link Layer) protocol software using the Digi Sync 470i 4-line cards and Windows XP.
  • ARC started development for PXS2, an upgraded version of the PXS with simpler design but more flexibility.
  • We upgraded Volt Delta Resources X.25-to-UDP gateway to LayGO® and Windows XP for the ATComm4 ISA 4-line synchronous adapters. The product is used by now AT&T and Verizon for Directory Assistance Services.
  • Because of problems reported by Alcatel's LayGO®/PCMCIA customers with Sealevel's PCMCIA cards in newer notebooks, ARC ported LayGO® to Microgate SyncLink PCMCIA card. The product was certified by WIPRO Bangalore, Alcatel's Shanghai technical support for the WinBSC (Cellular Base Station Controller).
  • ARC started work implementing the FTAM protocol. In the first step, we used the Siemens/Fujitsu FTAM library, and TCP/IP as underlying protocol.
  • In cooperation with T-Systems Göppingen and Telekom Darmstadt, we developed a project plan to upgrade the FixNet from FTAM/X.25/ISDN to (S) FTP/TCP/IP/Ethernet an intranet. The German Telekom uses Siemens EWSD and Alcatel S12 switches with RS-422 interfaces. The switches are connected to Siemens ISDN BRI terminal adapters.

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2004

  • In a joint operation with Technical Direct (UK) Cable & Wireless (France, acquired in 2012 by Vodaphone), we completed the software terminating the X.25 and AFT protocol at our Protocol eXchange Server (PXS). We developed client/server file transfer software that transfers files residing on one or on multiple DMS-100E switches to a remote file collector using TCP/IP. Cable & Wireless approved the PXS for their European network of nine Nortel DMS-100E switches. Since April 2004 the PXS has been fully employed and operational, with great cost and maintenance benefits for Cable & Wireless.
  • Advanced Relay developed DLM (Data Line Monitor) software allowing the PXS to be programmed to operate as a dedicated DLM. Other than the software TAP, the PXS DLM uses a customized T-cable to be inserted between a communicating DTE and DCE.
  • The PXS is released, and we received the first 100 units from Comtrol Corp.

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2003

  • Advanced Relay was contracted by Honeywell Technology Solutions to port LayGO® HDLC driver to a 64-bit Solaris 8.0 for the Sun Ultra AXi motherboard.
  • GETS Global Signaling contracted us through Orthstar to port our LayGO® driver and protocol software to VenturCom (now IntervalZero) Real Time Extension (RTX) for Windows. The product is fully operational.
  • For Lockheed Martin Advanced Relay ported LayGO® software to a customized dual-processor Pentium and a 4-line Emulex (XP-4400) synchronous communication adapter. The product is fully operational.
  • Advanced Relay was subcontracted by SBS Technologies (now GE Fanuc) to support X.25 in an embedded communication switch used by Ericsson AB Mobitex Division (Göteborg). The target system was a Force PowerCore-6750 Single slot CPU board based on a PowerPC 750 processor, the target OS MontaVista real time Linux, and the target communication adapter was the SBS Aries/524 4-line PMC module, including an HDLC driver provided by SBS. The product was completed by Advanced Relay. However, Ericsson cancelled the project with SBS.
  • Advanced Relay completed work on the PXS, an embedded LayGO® server using an ARM7 network processor. Advanced Relay and Technical Direct (UK) joined forces to use the PXS as a protocol exchange server for DMS-100E switches used by Cable & Wireless France (Since 2012 part of Vodaphone). The PXS terminates the AFT/X.25 data and forwards the CDR files via a file client/server module to a remote CDR file collector. We customized the Nortel AFT (Automatic File Transfer) protocol to be compatible to the DMS-100E used in Europe. First tests at Cable & Wireless were completed by the end of 2003.

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2002

  • Advanced Relay developed a customized Bisynchronous driver for the Sealevel PCMCIA card and the Digi SYNC/570i PCI card in a project for the Chilean Air Force.
  • For Lynk Systems (Atlanta), Advanced Relay developed a customized Bisynchronous driver for the Sealevel PCI card.
  • TRW (Northrop Grumman Space and Mission Systems) contracted Advanced Relay to develop a Solaris 8.0 64-bit chained DMA driver for the Digi SYNC/570i PCI card (Hitachi 64570). We assisted TRW in the final test phase.
  • British Telecom's RedCare Division selected our LayGO®/X.25 Digi SYNC/570i solution for their burglar alarm detection network and for other X.25/LAPB implementations. The product is in wide use in Europe.
  • Advanced Relay developed a front-end ISDN solution for the Lucent 5ESS to collect CDRs and exchange operational messages. For this project we developed a customized driver for the Winbond ISDN chip to interface directly to the Lucent BRI (0B+D) via X.25/LAPD. The product was successfully tested at Southwestern Bell (SBC, now AT&T).
  • Advanced Relay finalized the functional specification for the PXS project and selected Comtrol Corporation as manufacturer of the PXS hardware. We started the PXS software development using a development platform provided by Comtrol.
  • Advanced Relay developed a LayGO® Data Line Monitor, using a software Tap to capture transmitted and received data, to be forwarded via TCP/IP to a DLM server. The DLM server can either record the data traffic to a file or directly pass the data to a protocol analyzer application for real-time analysis. We evaluated several existing protocol analyzers and their GUI and selected the Frontline Test Equipment GUI to be supported by the LayGO® DLM.

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2001

  • Advanced Relay provided the LayGO®/X.25 PCMCIA card solution to Alcatel (France) for their BSC (Base Station Controller). It is used worldwide in their cellular networks.
  • Volt Delta Resources selected Advanced Relay for the extension and upgrade of their X.25 UDP/IP gateway used by Verizon and other telecom customers in their Operator Attendant applications. For this project we developed a Windows 2000 driver for Patriot Scientific's ATComm4 synchronous communication card.
  • Jointly with Honeywell, Advanced Relay completed the PC/104 base station modem that interfaces via HDLC/LAPB to a Park Air 5525 D8 radio. The product is used to provide infight airplanes with current weather information.
  • We worked with the Ohio University Avionics Engineering Center to independently verify the product for Park Air Electronics (UK)..
  • Advanced Relay was selected by TRW (Northrop Grumman Space and Mission Systems) to develop the communication interface for a missile defense network. For that project we ported our LayGO® software to the Solaris 8.0 64-bit operating system. The protocol is HDLC, and the synchronous communication cards are the 2-line Digi SYNC/570i and SBS WANic/522. Harris, Rockwell Collins, Boeing and Raytheon.
  • Advanced Relay was selected by TASC, Inc. (now Northrop Grumman Information Technology, TASC) to provide a LayGO®/HDLC (simplex) implementation for a customized Sealevel PCMCIA card used by the U.S. Army in their Sidearm product to transfer images via satellite to notebooks (Panasonic Toughbooks) on the ground.
  • For Titan Systems Corporation, Advanced Relay developed a customized Bisynchronous driver used by the U.S. Navy to provide secure phone connections to submarines.
  • For Marconi (now Ericsson) in Florence, Italy, Advanced Relay developed a multi-drop HDLC driver for the Quatech MPC-100 adapter.
  • Advanced Relay developed a transparent monosynchronous driver for Boeing.
  • For the FAA, Advanced Relay developed a half-duplex transparent HDLC driver that includes time-stamping.

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2000

  • Advanced Relay and Comtech (now Vero Systems, Inc.) jointly developed AFT-EIU support for Northern Telecom DMS-300 used by Nortel in a data collection application.
  • Advanced Relay and Telesciences jointly developed HDLC/NRM support for Northern Telecom DMS-10/BMC and Siemens/Stromberg DCO interface used by TDS Madison, WI in a data collection application.
  • Advanced Relay ported LayGO® to Digi's SYNC 570i 2/4-line PCI card. Advanced Relay ported LayGO® to GMM Research's 2-line PC104 and to Sealevel's 1-line PC104 card. The product is used by Honeywell to use radio communication to broadcast weather information between a base-station and airborne aircrafts.
  • Advanced Relay developed a special transparent driver with time stamps for the Sealevel PCMCIA card used by the FAA to track airborne aircraft. The FAA also uses a X.25 driver to capture and store radar data from the Eurocontrol Asterix protocol.
  • Advanced Relay developed a special driver for the Sealevel PCMCIA card used by Nortel Networks France in a BTS (Base Transceiver Station) application.
  • Advanced Relay developed a special driver for the Sealevel PCMCIA card used by Alstom to test equipment for the Washington D.C. subway system.
  • Advanced Relay developed Win2000 support for all of their supported hardware platforms. All drivers are native Win2000 Kernel Mode Drivers.

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1999

  • Advanced Relay developed AFT-X.25 support for Northern Telecom DMS-100/250 used in a data collection application for South Western Bell (now AT&T). Advanced Relay developed MAP-Path-Through software using RPC to support simultaneous connections to DMS-100 and 5ESS switches. One Solaris LayGO® RPC client controls multiple NT RPC LayGO® servers.
  • Advanced Relay developed for Pacific Bell (now AT&T) a LayGO®/XOT client that controls about 400 remote Cisco routers operating as XOT servers connected to Nortel DMS-100 and Lucent 5ESS switches.
  • Advanced Relay developed a special driver for Sealevel PCMCIA card, used by Harmon Industries (now GE TS) in a process control application for the San Francisco BART and the New York subway system.

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1998

  • Advanced Relay ported LayGO® to Sealevel's ACB-PC synchronous PCMCIA card. Advanced Relay ported LayGO® to Quatech MPAP-100 synchronous PCMCIA card.
  • Advanced Relay added LayGO® support for SUN Microsystem Ultra workstation under Solaris. Advanced Relay extended RPC support for NT and Solaris platforms.
  • In a joint operation with Comtech (now Vero Systems, Inc.), Advanced Relay developed for South Western Bell (now AT&T) front-end support for Northern Telecom DMS-100 switch with X.25 interface used in a data collection application. Advanced Relay developed front-end support for Lucent (AT&T) 5ESS 0B+D X.25 interface used in a data collection application.
  • Advanced Relay developed front-end support for Motorola EMX-250 and 2500 LAPB interface used in a data collection application.
  • Advanced Relay ported LayGO® to operate under QNX.
  • Advanced Relay used LayGO® with X.25/LAPD to connect to 5ESS switches replacing AT&T Interface Devices that had shown synchronization problems converting LAPD into LAPB.

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1997

  • Advanced Relay ported LayGO® to the SDL RISCom/SA, an 8-line ISA card supporting up to 128 Kbps per line. Advanced Relay added X.25 over LAPD support.
  • Advanced Relay ported LayGO® to the Metacomp ATcom BRI ISDN controller to support HDLC, LAPB, Frame Relay and X.25 over B-channel.
  • Advanced Relay ported LayGO® to the Emulex XP-Series cards, 2/4/8-line PCI cards supporting 8 Mbps total throughput.
  • Advanced Relay added support for Borland 24-bit DOS extender.
  • Advanced Relay added Remote Procedure Call (RPC) support for Windows 95 and Windows NT.
  • Advanced Relay developed a LAPD protocol stack used by British Telecomm's RedCare division in a burglary alarm system. Up to 4095 houses with ISDN BRI connections are monitored per physical connection. The interface uses X.25 over LAPD.
  • TITAN (Linkabit Division) subcontracted Advanced Relay to develop a X.25 switch used by the Bank of Agriculture and Agricultural Cooperatives (BAAC) in Thailand to connect up to 600 rural banks through satellite modems to a central bank in Bangkok. The LayGO® system uses four 8-line synchronous communication cards supporting a total of 32 satellite modems at speeds of 38.4 kbps and high-speed 2-line communication cards connected to a Motorola X.25 switch at T1 line speed.

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1996

  • Advanced Relay released LayGO® for Windows NT and added Visual Basic support.
  • Advanced Relay developed a LayGO® Bridge/Router that transparently bridges/routes Ethernet traffic over any of LayGO® supported protocols. The product was tested on Advanced Relay's internal network that uses Novell, Windows 95, Windows 3.1x and Windows NT servers and workstations. Advanced Relay added Bisynchronous support to LayGO.
  • ARC ported LayGO® to the SDL WANic 400 card, a 2-line high performance PCI card supporting 8 Mbps per line.
  • Advanced Relay added support for Pharlap 32-bit DOS extender.
  • Advanced Relay developed a LAPB/BSC to TCP/IP gateway for Norden, a division of Northrop/Grumman to route HDLC/LAPB and BSC radar data to LAN workstations where the data are processed. The system is used by Changi Airport in Singapore.
  • For American Technology Inc. (ATI) we implemented a LayGO® FOX Pro API. The hardware was the Comtrol Hostess Synchronous ISA card.
  • For Nera ASA Norway, we developed a raw mode HDLC driver with RS-422 signaling. The product is used by dragging data collecting buoys behind a ship.

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1995

  • LayGO® software passed DDN and CEPT Net2 certification. Advanced Relay released the first DOS version of LayGO®. LayGO® was ported to all hardware used by PC.25T and PC.25e to provide an upgrade path to our customers.
  • Advanced Relay released LayGO® for Win3.1 and Win95. LayGO® was ported to the Metacomp (now Patriot Scientific) ATcomXL and the SDL RISCom/N2, both high performance 2-line ISA controllers supporting 8 Mbps per line.
  • Ocean Routes (now Weather News) Palo Alto was the first customer for LayGO® (as they were in 1984 for our PC.25!).Weather Data received from the East Coast via X.25, were converted to TCP/IP and forwarded to a SUN Workstation for processing. The Weather Data were then forwarded to the International Shipping to adjust their routing according to weather conditions.
  • BOEING Defense & Space Group (Military Airplane Division), Seattle, WA used our PC.25e to develop a X.25 front-end communication server.
  • Advanced Relay added Frame Relay and X.25 over Frame Relay (Annex G) support and passed Frame Relay acceptance tests.
  • Advanced Relay ported LayGO® to Sealevel and Quatech PCMCIA cards.

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1994

  • Advanced Relay started the LayGO® project, a complete redesign of Advanced Relay's communications products. In the same year PC.25T went through a major upgrade resulting in improved performance and easier installation.
  • AT&T (now AT&T) used our PC.25e/X.25 for their international Asian operation.
  • Bell Atlantic (now Verizon) Video Services used the PC.25e 1-line and PC/25T 4-line as X.25 to 802.3 Bridges.

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1993

  • Advanced Relay and Volt Delta Resources obtained acceptance of PC.25T to be used by Nynex (now Verizon) and other telecommunication companies on the Northern Telecom DMS-200 to provide operator attendants with information services. AT&T used PC.25e for a similar application.
  • In the same year PC.25T was used by LDDS (now MCI) to collect billing data from DSC DEX 500.
  • Advanced Relay developed a billing collection application for then West Coast Telecommunication, Santa Barbara CA used on their DEX 500 phone switch.
  • Burlington Northern Railroad (now Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway) used the PC.25e/LAPB to monitor and control railroad switches.
  • Communications Test Design, Inc., West Chester PA, used the PC.25e/X.25 as a front-end test device for an AT&T DDM-2000 optical multiplexer.

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1992

  • Advanced Relay released PC.25e, a low-cost version of PC.25T using a non-intelligent communication controller. Besides X.25, the product supported HDLC and LAPB as independent protocol stacks. All protocols were implemented as installable DOS device drivers. PC.25e could be combined with multi-line asynchronous controllers to build multi-line X.25 PADs. The first version used Sealevel's ACB boards, but later similar boards from Linear Systems and Comtrol were supported as well.
  • In the same year Advanced Relay released PC.25UX, a SCO and AT&T UNIX implementation of PC.25T.
  • Conoco Pipe Line Corporation (now ConocoPhillips) uses the PC.25T/X.25 2-line as gateway for data collection of 150+ RTU (Remote Terminal Units) monitoring points located at various pump stations, injection points, and deliver facilities along the pipeline system. The data are now forwarded via an X.25 Satellite connection to the Central Supervisory Control System (CSCS). The previous connections used leased phone lines. There are 180+ major CSCS components dispersed throughout 14 states.

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1991

  • Advanced Relay released XBRIDGE/IPX, a WAN bridge for Novell based LANs. The product was originally developed for Acer Technology to provide worldwide WAN access for Acer's maintenance operations. At this time Novell did not support burst mode traffic in their NCP, and throughput was notoriously sluggish. An X.25 connection through Tymnet could support about 30% data throughput. Advanced Relay released XTURBO, a filtering technique that increased data throughput to 87%.
  • ARC obtained CEPT NET2 Certification of the X.25 protocol stack at ZZF Saarbrücken in Germany.
  • RIM (Research in Motion) Waterloo Ontario licensed the ARX.25 software to be used in a QNX system to interface to Cellular Base Station Controllers to manage the routing of cellular phone calls.
  • In a joint cooperation with RLG (Research Library Group) now part of OCLC (Online Computer Library Center), THE BRITISH LIBRARY (Computing and Telecommunications), the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF) and the Bayerische Landesbibliotek used our PC.25/X.25 product to provide the Library and customers remote access to their or other libraries.

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1990

  • Advanced Relay released PC.25T, an upgraded version of the PC.25, using high performance 80186 based 4-line controller with full-duplex DMA on all channels. Unidata (formerly Datakor), South Africa manufactured the original hardware, the DCP-M1 and DCP-M2. The Metacomp ATComm2 and ATComm4 replaced this hardware in the same year.
  • AI Soft Korea became an ARX.25 Licensee. The product was used in their NetVision product.

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1989

  • Advanced Relay released PC.25pad, a modified version of PC.PAD. The PAD functions were implemented as a host linkable library and the product included support for SCO XENIX. Advanced Relay released PC.25pad+, an upgraded version of PC.25pad that used the faster XP ISA board manufactured by Comtrol. This release also included support for SCO UNIX.
  • Honeywell Commercial Flight Systems Group used the PC.25T and our XCOPY X.25 File Transfer Program to exchange Flight data between Europe and the U.S. using the Tymnet X.25 PSDN.
  • Aerospatiale, now part of The European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company (EADS), used the PC.25T and our XBRIDGE X.25 LAN/WAN Bridge to exchange data between their international operations.

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1988

  • Advanced Relay released PC.PAD, ARX.25 and PAD functions ported to the SmartHostess, an 8-line intelligent communication controller manufactured by Comtrol Corporation. The product supported one or two X.25 lines and seven or six asynchronous terminals. All lines supported 19.2 Kbps. The product was used as a terminal PAD and operated under MS-DOS. Once downloaded the product could operate automatically.

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1987

  • Advanced Relay was the first ever to port X.25 and PAD functions to a Basic Rate ISDN PC controller manufactured by Teleos New Jersey.

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1986

  • Advanced Relay and Invisible Software jointly developed XBRIDGE/NetBIOS, a WAN bridge using NetBIOS. Advanced Relay added WAN support for the Apple Macintosh using Centram West's TOPS product. Advanced Relay added Bisynchronous support to PC.25 used by OCLC (Online Computer Library Center) in Dublin, OH for their library clusters.

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1985

  • Advanced Relay was the first ever to port X.25 to an IBM PC using the Emulex (Persyst) DCP-88/VM. The product was introduced as PC.25 and the X.25 software was certified in the same year by Telenet, Tymnet, Uninet and DDN. With this product Advanced Relay released the XTERM terminal PAD and the XCOPY file transfer program. Advanced Relay was the first ever to release multi-window, multi-tasking support for PC.25 using Quarterdeck's DESQview environment. Simultaneous terminal PAD and file transfer sessions could be run from multiple windows.

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1984

  • Advanced Relay converted the product from Z80 Assembler to C. That source code version was marketed as ARX.25. The first source licensees were Ocean Routes Palo Alto, CA and Datakor Johannesburg, South Africa who used to enable the South African Railway to switch their communication lines from railway wired to SapoNet X.25 PSDN. Datakor also developed Univac Tape-to-X.25 and Burroughs Disk-to-X.25 emulation in the Banking industry.

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1983

  • Advanced Relay was the first ever to port X.25 to a Z80/Z80-SIO based personal computer running CP/M+. The product was certified in the same year.

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